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Molewyn View Things to do and see

Jill

Molewyn View Things to do and see

Sightseeing
Snowdonia is a mountainous region in north-western Wales and a national park of 823 square miles in area. It was the first to be designated of the three national parks in Wales, in 1951. It contains the highest peaks in the United Kingdom outside of Scotland. Its also boasts the largest lake in Wales. For the various walks from Leisurely walks to hard strenuous walks please use this link https://www.eryri-npa.gov.uk/visiting/walking This site will also update regarding the Covid19.
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Parque Nacional Snowdonia
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Snowdonia is a mountainous region in north-western Wales and a national park of 823 square miles in area. It was the first to be designated of the three national parks in Wales, in 1951. It contains the highest peaks in the United Kingdom outside of Scotland. Its also boasts the largest lake in Wales. For the various walks from Leisurely walks to hard strenuous walks please use this link https://www.eryri-npa.gov.uk/visiting/walking This site will also update regarding the Covid19.
Known locally as ‘Port,’ Porthmadog is situated on the edge of The Snowdonia National Park on the estuary of the Afon Glaslyn as it runs into Tremadog Bay. It’s one of the largest towns in Snowdonia with a population of around 4,200. It has a good selection of shops which make it a natural base for holidaymakers who want to explore Snowdonia and the coastline of the Llŷn Peninsula. It’s one of the newest towns in Wales, only being created in 1810-1811 after William Madocks built a sea wall (The Cob) and reclaimed a 7,000 acres of Traeth Mawr (The Big Beach). This also happened to create a new natural harbour deep enough for small sailing ships that started to appear around 1825 with the first appearance of the name ‘Port Madoc’ in 1830 when the Ffestiniog Railway opened. Porthmadog developed as a famous port later in the nineteenth century when it began exporting the slate produced at the quarries in Ffestiniog and Llanfrothen to roof houses in the expanding towns and cities in England and all over the world. By 1873 more than a thousand ships carrying over 116,000 tons of slate left Porthmadog. The Railway and It’s Legacy The tracks and locos left behind after the slate trade also make it one of the most popular tourist areas in Wales being the hub of the Ffestiniog Railway, The Welsh Highland Railway and the smaller Welsh Highland Heritage Railway. It’s also one of the stations on the Cambrian Coast main line which runs along the coast from Pwllheli on the Llŷn Peninsula to Machynlleth, there is goes on to Shrewsbury in the East or Aberystwyth in the South. Places to eat (Please check opening due to Covid restrictions things mat change) https://porthmadog.wales/directory/sticky-treats/ https://porthmadog.wales/directory/cadwaladers/ https://porthmadog.wales/directory/kerfoots/ https://porthmadog.wales/directory/spooners-grill-cafe-bar/ Menus may be limited. Things to visit and do https://porthmadog.wales/directory/inigo-jones-slate-works/ https://porthmadog.wales/directory/porthmadog-sailing-club/ https://porthmadog.wales/directory/blackrock-llama-center/ https://porthmadog.wales/directory/sygun-copper-mine/
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Porthmadog
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Known locally as ‘Port,’ Porthmadog is situated on the edge of The Snowdonia National Park on the estuary of the Afon Glaslyn as it runs into Tremadog Bay. It’s one of the largest towns in Snowdonia with a population of around 4,200. It has a good selection of shops which make it a natural base for holidaymakers who want to explore Snowdonia and the coastline of the Llŷn Peninsula. It’s one of the newest towns in Wales, only being created in 1810-1811 after William Madocks built a sea wall (The Cob) and reclaimed a 7,000 acres of Traeth Mawr (The Big Beach). This also happened to create a new natural harbour deep enough for small sailing ships that started to appear around 1825 with the first appearance of the name ‘Port Madoc’ in 1830 when the Ffestiniog Railway opened. Porthmadog developed as a famous port later in the nineteenth century when it began exporting the slate produced at the quarries in Ffestiniog and Llanfrothen to roof houses in the expanding towns and cities in England and all over the world. By 1873 more than a thousand ships carrying over 116,000 tons of slate left Porthmadog. The Railway and It’s Legacy The tracks and locos left behind after the slate trade also make it one of the most popular tourist areas in Wales being the hub of the Ffestiniog Railway, The Welsh Highland Railway and the smaller Welsh Highland Heritage Railway. It’s also one of the stations on the Cambrian Coast main line which runs along the coast from Pwllheli on the Llŷn Peninsula to Machynlleth, there is goes on to Shrewsbury in the East or Aberystwyth in the South. Places to eat (Please check opening due to Covid restrictions things mat change) https://porthmadog.wales/directory/sticky-treats/ https://porthmadog.wales/directory/cadwaladers/ https://porthmadog.wales/directory/kerfoots/ https://porthmadog.wales/directory/spooners-grill-cafe-bar/ Menus may be limited. Things to visit and do https://porthmadog.wales/directory/inigo-jones-slate-works/ https://porthmadog.wales/directory/porthmadog-sailing-club/ https://porthmadog.wales/directory/blackrock-llama-center/ https://porthmadog.wales/directory/sygun-copper-mine/
Portmeirion was created by Welsh architect Clough Williams-Ellis from 1925 to 1976. He wanted to show how a naturally beautiful site could be developed without spoiling it. Today Portmeirion is one of Wales' premier visitor attractions, welcoming over 200,000 visitors every year. Visitors to Portmeirion can enjoy complimentary guided walking tours with one of our friendly tour guides. We also offer a complimentary audio-visual show featuring Clough Williams-Ellis discussing how and why the village was built and a free land train tour of the Gwyllt woodlands. Our Welcome Centre is open all year to help with any information, books or maps you might require. It addition to its architectural heritage, its stunning setting and sub-tropical gardens, Portmeirion has two stylish hotels, a cluster of self-catering cottages, shops, a spa, cafes and restaurants and an authentic Italian style gelateria. *Guided tours and land train are available from Easter to October only. TOLL & WELCOME AREA The Toll & Welcome Area is home to the Main Toll Gate entrance to the village, as well as the coach car park, Welcome Centre and public toilets. Our complimentary 20-minute Guided Tours start from this area of the village. Guests can purchase tailored tours, buggy tours or buy tickets for the daily The Prisoner tour from our Welcome Centre, as well as find maps and information about the village, accommodation and local area. CLIFFTOP & CHANTRY ROW Clifftop & Chantry Row offers spectacular views of the Estuary. Guests can walk down to the Clifftop Rotunda, or Grotto, featuring sweeping views across the Estuary. Stop to hear Clough Williams-Ellis give an introduction to the village at the Soundscape under Bridge House. Here, you will also find The Dome, which houses seasonal exhibitions. More information on exhibitions can be found in our Welcome Centre. BATTERY SQUARE & CAMPANILE The Mermaid Spa is located in Battery Square. Walk over to the Mermaid Spa for beautiful coastal views. Battery Square is home to The Round House, which was the fictional home of Number 6 in the TV series The Prisoner. The Campanile Bell Tower is the focal feature of Battery Square. CENTRAL PIAZZA No Italian village is complete without a central piazza. The Central Piazza at Portmeirion features a fountain pool, Gloriette, Gothic Pavilion, the Bristol Colonnade and the giant chessboard. SALUTATION SQUARE In Salutation Square, guests will find the Triumphal Arch and the Audio-Visual building featuring a 20 minute video about the village featuring Clough Williams-Ellis. The train station for the Woodland Train is also located in Salutation Square. Some of the best views of the village can be enjoyed from Salutation Square. TOWN HALL The historic Hercules Hall is located in this part of the village. Hercules Hall is an Arts-and-Crafts style village hall designed to house a Jacobean ceiling, panelling and mullioned windows salvaged from Emral Hall in Flintshire. You will also find the Hercules Hall and Tudor Room private function rooms in this area of the village. THE HOTEL & QUAYSIDE Explore the Coastal Path, Estuary, Amis Reunis, the Observatory Tower and the Casino at The Hotel & Quayside. The area of the village houses the outdoor heated pool, available for residents to enjoy (March - Oct). You'll also find the Mirrror Room and Estuary Dining Room private function rooms in this area of the village. Y GWYLLT WOODLANDS From the Triumphal Arch in Salutation Square, there are two main paths into Y Gwyllt Woodlands. Featuring 70 acres of woodland and 20 miles of walking paths, the Woodland is home to hidden treasures including the Dog Cemetery, Ghost Garden, Tangle Wood and the Chinese Lake. Guests can enjoy a breath-taking view of the village and estuary from the Gazebo, designed by Susan Williams-Ellis to mark the centenary of Clough's birth. CASTELL DEUDRAETH Removed from the main village, Castell Deudraeth stands proudly on the main drive in and out of the village. This area is home to several large car parks and a dedicated disabled car park, as well as 2 self-catering cottages. The Ricardo Pearce Suite private function room is located at Castell Deudraeth. Places to eat - they also provide takeways please book on the website link https://portmeirion.wales/eat Portmeirion Village offers a variety of dining options from the fine-dining experience in the Art Deco Restaurant at Hotel Portmeirion to the more relaxed Brasserie at Castell Deudraeth. Several cafes on-site serve up the classics, including Town Hall, Caffi'r Sgwâr and Caffi No 6, while Caffi Glas specialises in Italian favourites such as pasta, pizza and salads. Caffi'r Angel is a traditional gelateria, making our very own Portmeirion Gelato right here on-site! And you can enjoy Afternoon Tea on the Terrace at Hotel Portmeirion, or in the lounges or bar.
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Portmeirion
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Portmeirion was created by Welsh architect Clough Williams-Ellis from 1925 to 1976. He wanted to show how a naturally beautiful site could be developed without spoiling it. Today Portmeirion is one of Wales' premier visitor attractions, welcoming over 200,000 visitors every year. Visitors to Portmeirion can enjoy complimentary guided walking tours with one of our friendly tour guides. We also offer a complimentary audio-visual show featuring Clough Williams-Ellis discussing how and why the village was built and a free land train tour of the Gwyllt woodlands. Our Welcome Centre is open all year to help with any information, books or maps you might require. It addition to its architectural heritage, its stunning setting and sub-tropical gardens, Portmeirion has two stylish hotels, a cluster of self-catering cottages, shops, a spa, cafes and restaurants and an authentic Italian style gelateria. *Guided tours and land train are available from Easter to October only. TOLL & WELCOME AREA The Toll & Welcome Area is home to the Main Toll Gate entrance to the village, as well as the coach car park, Welcome Centre and public toilets. Our complimentary 20-minute Guided Tours start from this area of the village. Guests can purchase tailored tours, buggy tours or buy tickets for the daily The Prisoner tour from our Welcome Centre, as well as find maps and information about the village, accommodation and local area. CLIFFTOP & CHANTRY ROW Clifftop & Chantry Row offers spectacular views of the Estuary. Guests can walk down to the Clifftop Rotunda, or Grotto, featuring sweeping views across the Estuary. Stop to hear Clough Williams-Ellis give an introduction to the village at the Soundscape under Bridge House. Here, you will also find The Dome, which houses seasonal exhibitions. More information on exhibitions can be found in our Welcome Centre. BATTERY SQUARE & CAMPANILE The Mermaid Spa is located in Battery Square. Walk over to the Mermaid Spa for beautiful coastal views. Battery Square is home to The Round House, which was the fictional home of Number 6 in the TV series The Prisoner. The Campanile Bell Tower is the focal feature of Battery Square. CENTRAL PIAZZA No Italian village is complete without a central piazza. The Central Piazza at Portmeirion features a fountain pool, Gloriette, Gothic Pavilion, the Bristol Colonnade and the giant chessboard. SALUTATION SQUARE In Salutation Square, guests will find the Triumphal Arch and the Audio-Visual building featuring a 20 minute video about the village featuring Clough Williams-Ellis. The train station for the Woodland Train is also located in Salutation Square. Some of the best views of the village can be enjoyed from Salutation Square. TOWN HALL The historic Hercules Hall is located in this part of the village. Hercules Hall is an Arts-and-Crafts style village hall designed to house a Jacobean ceiling, panelling and mullioned windows salvaged from Emral Hall in Flintshire. You will also find the Hercules Hall and Tudor Room private function rooms in this area of the village. THE HOTEL & QUAYSIDE Explore the Coastal Path, Estuary, Amis Reunis, the Observatory Tower and the Casino at The Hotel & Quayside. The area of the village houses the outdoor heated pool, available for residents to enjoy (March - Oct). You'll also find the Mirrror Room and Estuary Dining Room private function rooms in this area of the village. Y GWYLLT WOODLANDS From the Triumphal Arch in Salutation Square, there are two main paths into Y Gwyllt Woodlands. Featuring 70 acres of woodland and 20 miles of walking paths, the Woodland is home to hidden treasures including the Dog Cemetery, Ghost Garden, Tangle Wood and the Chinese Lake. Guests can enjoy a breath-taking view of the village and estuary from the Gazebo, designed by Susan Williams-Ellis to mark the centenary of Clough's birth. CASTELL DEUDRAETH Removed from the main village, Castell Deudraeth stands proudly on the main drive in and out of the village. This area is home to several large car parks and a dedicated disabled car park, as well as 2 self-catering cottages. The Ricardo Pearce Suite private function room is located at Castell Deudraeth. Places to eat - they also provide takeways please book on the website link https://portmeirion.wales/eat Portmeirion Village offers a variety of dining options from the fine-dining experience in the Art Deco Restaurant at Hotel Portmeirion to the more relaxed Brasserie at Castell Deudraeth. Several cafes on-site serve up the classics, including Town Hall, Caffi'r Sgwâr and Caffi No 6, while Caffi Glas specialises in Italian favourites such as pasta, pizza and salads. Caffi'r Angel is a traditional gelateria, making our very own Portmeirion Gelato right here on-site! And you can enjoy Afternoon Tea on the Terrace at Hotel Portmeirion, or in the lounges or bar.
None of Edward I’s mighty coastal fortresses has a more spectacular setting Harlech Castle crowns a sheer rocky crag overlooking the dunes far below – waiting in vain for the tide to turn and the distant sea to lap at its feet once again. No further drama is really required but, just in case, the rugged peaks of Snowdonia rise as a backdrop. Against fierce competition from Conwy, Caernarfon and Beaumaris, this is probably the most spectacular setting for any of Edward I’s castles in North Wales. All four are designated as a World Heritage Site. Harlech was completed from ground to battlements in just seven years under the guidance of gifted architect Master James of St George. Its classic ‘walls within walls’ design makes the most of daunting natural defences. Even when completely cut off by the rebellion of Madog ap Llewelyn the castle held out – thanks to the ‘Way from the Sea’. This path of 108 steps rising steeply up the rock face allowed the besieged defenders to be fed and watered by ship. Harlech is easier to conquer today. An incredible ‘floating’ footbridge allows you to enter this great castle as Master James intended – for the first time in 600 years. The rousing tune of ‘Men of Harlech’ is Wales’s alternative national anthem, much loved by rugby fans and regimental bands alike. According to the movie ‘Zulu’ it was even belted out by the garrison at Rorke’s Drift. No wonder Harlech Castle was the inspiration for this tale of heroism in the face of overwhelming odds. Its great towers and rugged walls saw one siege after another during some of the most epic encounters of Welsh history. During the Wars of the Roses the Lancastrian-held castle was surrounded by an immense Yorkist army commanded by William Herbert of Raglan. Poet Hywel Dafi told of men being ‘shattered by the sound of guns’ with ‘seven thousand men shooting in every port, their bows made from every yew tree’. Under this furious onslaught the castle succumbed in less than a month. Fifty prisoners were taken including the Welsh constable Dafydd ab Ieuan ab Einion, who had kept ‘little Harlech for so long, alone faithful to the weak crown’. These were the heroic ‘Men of Harlech’ of the song. Unless, that is, you believe the alternative theory. In 1404 the castle fell to the charismatic prince Owain Glyndŵr during the last major rebellion against English rule. Together with nearby Machynlleth it became the centre of Glyndŵr’s inspiring vision of an independent Wales. He moved his main residence and court here and summoned his followers from all over the country to attend a great parliament. It may well have been at Harlech Castle that he was formally crowned Prince of Wales in the presence of envoys from Scotland, France and Spain. But this glory didn’t last. By 1409 Harlech was besieged by the forces of Harry of Monmouth – later Henry V, hero of Agincourt. One huge cannon nicknamed ‘the king’s daughter’ actually burst during the relentless bombardment he rained down on the castle walls. Eventually, hungry and exhausted, the garrison fell. Glyndŵr himself escaped although his wife and daughters were captured. Might these gallant Welsh defenders be the true Men of Harlech? There was still time for one more famous siege. From the spring of 1644 Harlech was defended for the king by its constable Colonel William Owen. It was the very last royalist stronghold to fall. By the time its surviving garrison of 16 officers, gentlemen and invalids finally surrendered in 1647, it marked the end of the English Civil War.
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Harlech Castle
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None of Edward I’s mighty coastal fortresses has a more spectacular setting Harlech Castle crowns a sheer rocky crag overlooking the dunes far below – waiting in vain for the tide to turn and the distant sea to lap at its feet once again. No further drama is really required but, just in case, the rugged peaks of Snowdonia rise as a backdrop. Against fierce competition from Conwy, Caernarfon and Beaumaris, this is probably the most spectacular setting for any of Edward I’s castles in North Wales. All four are designated as a World Heritage Site. Harlech was completed from ground to battlements in just seven years under the guidance of gifted architect Master James of St George. Its classic ‘walls within walls’ design makes the most of daunting natural defences. Even when completely cut off by the rebellion of Madog ap Llewelyn the castle held out – thanks to the ‘Way from the Sea’. This path of 108 steps rising steeply up the rock face allowed the besieged defenders to be fed and watered by ship. Harlech is easier to conquer today. An incredible ‘floating’ footbridge allows you to enter this great castle as Master James intended – for the first time in 600 years. The rousing tune of ‘Men of Harlech’ is Wales’s alternative national anthem, much loved by rugby fans and regimental bands alike. According to the movie ‘Zulu’ it was even belted out by the garrison at Rorke’s Drift. No wonder Harlech Castle was the inspiration for this tale of heroism in the face of overwhelming odds. Its great towers and rugged walls saw one siege after another during some of the most epic encounters of Welsh history. During the Wars of the Roses the Lancastrian-held castle was surrounded by an immense Yorkist army commanded by William Herbert of Raglan. Poet Hywel Dafi told of men being ‘shattered by the sound of guns’ with ‘seven thousand men shooting in every port, their bows made from every yew tree’. Under this furious onslaught the castle succumbed in less than a month. Fifty prisoners were taken including the Welsh constable Dafydd ab Ieuan ab Einion, who had kept ‘little Harlech for so long, alone faithful to the weak crown’. These were the heroic ‘Men of Harlech’ of the song. Unless, that is, you believe the alternative theory. In 1404 the castle fell to the charismatic prince Owain Glyndŵr during the last major rebellion against English rule. Together with nearby Machynlleth it became the centre of Glyndŵr’s inspiring vision of an independent Wales. He moved his main residence and court here and summoned his followers from all over the country to attend a great parliament. It may well have been at Harlech Castle that he was formally crowned Prince of Wales in the presence of envoys from Scotland, France and Spain. But this glory didn’t last. By 1409 Harlech was besieged by the forces of Harry of Monmouth – later Henry V, hero of Agincourt. One huge cannon nicknamed ‘the king’s daughter’ actually burst during the relentless bombardment he rained down on the castle walls. Eventually, hungry and exhausted, the garrison fell. Glyndŵr himself escaped although his wife and daughters were captured. Might these gallant Welsh defenders be the true Men of Harlech? There was still time for one more famous siege. From the spring of 1644 Harlech was defended for the king by its constable Colonel William Owen. It was the very last royalist stronghold to fall. By the time its surviving garrison of 16 officers, gentlemen and invalids finally surrendered in 1647, it marked the end of the English Civil War.
Harlech Beach provides a four-mile stretch of pristine golden sand, with stunning views of the Snowdonia mountain range. The beach is backed by grassy dunes. The Morfa Harlech National Nature Reserve at the north end of the beach is Wales’s only growing dune system and provides a good example of the effects of longshore drift. To the south lies Shell Island, a promontory which, as the name suggests has an abundance of shells. During the summer months leatherback turtles migrate from warmer climes to feed off jellyfish in the waters off this part of the coast. In 1988 a record-breaking 916kg leatherback was washed up here after becoming tangled in fishing equipment. Swimming in the clear waters here is generally safe although there is no lifeguard presence and at times jellyfish can be found off this part of the coastline. The beach is popular with families and dog walkers, although there are restrictions on dog walking at certain times of the year. 13th century Harlech Castle lies around 1000 metres behind the beach. This imposing structure was built as a stronghold by Edward I and played an important role in The War of the Roses and the English Civil War. It is open to visitors throughout the year. When it was first built the castle stood immediately next to the sea, but over the centuries the coastline has shifted significantly. To access the beach take the Ffordd Glan Mor road from the village of Harlech past the Min-y-don Holiday Park, beyond which is a pay-for car park. From here a 400 metre path leads down to the beach Type of beach Sandy Lifeguard service No Dogs friendly beach? Dogs allowed A small section of beach immediately in front of the holiday park has a dog ban between April 1st and September 30th. The rest of the beach is dog-friendly year round. Gwynedd dog friendly beaches » Activities Swimming/bathing Surfing Facilities Shop Nearest town Porthmadog Postcode LL46 2UG OS grid ref. SH 5684 3145 Water quality Water quality star rating Awards Green Coast AwardMarine Conservation Society Recommended
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Harlech Beach
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Harlech Beach provides a four-mile stretch of pristine golden sand, with stunning views of the Snowdonia mountain range. The beach is backed by grassy dunes. The Morfa Harlech National Nature Reserve at the north end of the beach is Wales’s only growing dune system and provides a good example of the effects of longshore drift. To the south lies Shell Island, a promontory which, as the name suggests has an abundance of shells. During the summer months leatherback turtles migrate from warmer climes to feed off jellyfish in the waters off this part of the coast. In 1988 a record-breaking 916kg leatherback was washed up here after becoming tangled in fishing equipment. Swimming in the clear waters here is generally safe although there is no lifeguard presence and at times jellyfish can be found off this part of the coastline. The beach is popular with families and dog walkers, although there are restrictions on dog walking at certain times of the year. 13th century Harlech Castle lies around 1000 metres behind the beach. This imposing structure was built as a stronghold by Edward I and played an important role in The War of the Roses and the English Civil War. It is open to visitors throughout the year. When it was first built the castle stood immediately next to the sea, but over the centuries the coastline has shifted significantly. To access the beach take the Ffordd Glan Mor road from the village of Harlech past the Min-y-don Holiday Park, beyond which is a pay-for car park. From here a 400 metre path leads down to the beach Type of beach Sandy Lifeguard service No Dogs friendly beach? Dogs allowed A small section of beach immediately in front of the holiday park has a dog ban between April 1st and September 30th. The rest of the beach is dog-friendly year round. Gwynedd dog friendly beaches » Activities Swimming/bathing Surfing Facilities Shop Nearest town Porthmadog Postcode LL46 2UG OS grid ref. SH 5684 3145 Water quality Water quality star rating Awards Green Coast AwardMarine Conservation Society Recommended
Gelert A short walk south of the village, following the footpath along the banks of the Glaslyn leads to Beddgelert's most famous historical feature; 'Gelert's Grave'. According to legend, the stone monument in the field marks the resting place of 'Gelert', the faithful hound of the medieval Welsh Prince Llewelyn the Great. The story, as written on the tombstone reads: "In the 13th century Llewelyn, prince of North Wales, had a palace at Beddgelert. One day he went hunting without Gelert, ‘The Faithful Hound’, who was unaccountably absent. On Llewelyn's return the truant, stained and smeared with blood, joyfully sprang to meet his master. The prince alarmed hastened to find his son, and saw the infant's cot empty, the bedclothes and floor covered with blood. The frantic father plunged his sword into the hound's side, thinking it had killed his heir. The dog's dying yell was answered by a child's cry. Llewelyn searched and discovered his boy unharmed, but nearby lay the body of a mighty wolf which Gelert had slain. The prince filled with remorse is said never to have smiled again. He buried Gelert here". Beddgelert is a village steeped in Welsh mythology and legend. Dinas Emrys (meaning “fortress of Ambrosius”) is a rocky wooded hillock above the Glaslyn river where a castle once stood. Some believe the castle was erected by the Welsh prince Llewelyn the Last. According to legend the castle was the site of the famous exchange between the warlord Vortigern and a young Merlin. Fleeing Anglo-Saxon invaders Vortigen came to Wales and chose the hillfort as his retreat. However all efforts at building on the site failed, with workers returning daily to find collapsed masonry. Vortigern was counselled to seek the help of a young boy born of a virgin mother; a suitable boy was found named Myrddin Emrys (Merlin Ambrosius). Vortigern’s plan to kill Myrddin to appease the supernatural powers preventing him from building his fortress was scorned by Myrddin who instead explained that the fort could not stand due to a hidden pool containing two dragons. The White Dragon – he explained – of the Saxons would in time be defeated by the British Red Dragon. After Vortigern’s downfall the fort was given to Emrys Wledig (Ambrosius Aurelianus) from which it takes its name. As for the dragons and how they became confined? The story of Lludd Lleflys in the Mabinogion explains how Lludd captured the dragons in a cauldron filled with beer when they had transformed themselves – as apparently they did – into pigs. The dragons were buried at the place that later became known as Dinas Emrys since it was regarded as the safest place to put them. A further legend tells of Myrddin hiding treasure in a cave at Dinas Emrys. The legend says that the discoverer of the treasure will be ‘golden-haired and blue-eyed’ and that a bell will ring to invite him or her into the cave. But beware! Local folklore tells of a young man from Beddgelert who once went in search of the treasure and was met with unearthly noises and thunder and lightning as soon as he started to dig. He fled home and never returned; not even to collect his pickaxe! Nowadays little remains of the castle structures, however excavations from 1910 and 1954-56 reveal several periods of habitation; the earliest dating to perhaps the 1st or 2nd century. Perhaps most intriguingly the pool inside the structure has been identified and is perhaps connected to the take of Vortigern and the dragons. Why not visit and experience the legends and myths for yourself? Rupert Bear & Beddgelert Mr. Alfred Edmeades Bestall M.B.E. Illustrator of the famous Rupert Bear stories which ran in The Daily Express newspaper for over 40 years lived in Beddgelert. Bestall was a quiet man and is remembered fondly in the Village. He bought his little cottage "Penlan" in 1956. His most famous drawing "The Frogs Chorus" inspired the cartoon video "The Frog Song" composed by Paul McCartney. This became one of the best-selling videos. There is no doubt that many of the illustrations to Alfred's stories were inspired by the scenery in and around Beddgelert. Over the footbridge and alongside the River Glaslyn, a meadow known as "Cae Gel" has recently been planted with shrubs, trees and wild flowers, to be used as a picnic area. It has been created with the financial help of "The Followers of Rupert Bear" in memory of Alfred E. Bestall, M.B.E. Glaslyn Osprey Project Ospreys disappeared from the UK in 1916, but in 2004 a pair of breeding ospreys were found in North Wales near to Beddgelert. The ospreys spend every winter in West Africa, and each year they migrate many thousands of miles back to Snowdonia to breed and raise chicks. By 2009 the pair had raised 12 osprey fledglings; the progress of the birds being recorded by a ringing scheme. One of the Glaslyn ospreys has been tracked to Scotland where it has raised a family of its own. The Osprey Project ensures 24-hour protection for the eggs in the nest. The site is a major attraction for visitors to the area; both for keen twitchers and for visiting families. You can also keep up with the progress via the project's Facebook page.
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Beddgelert
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Gelert A short walk south of the village, following the footpath along the banks of the Glaslyn leads to Beddgelert's most famous historical feature; 'Gelert's Grave'. According to legend, the stone monument in the field marks the resting place of 'Gelert', the faithful hound of the medieval Welsh Prince Llewelyn the Great. The story, as written on the tombstone reads: "In the 13th century Llewelyn, prince of North Wales, had a palace at Beddgelert. One day he went hunting without Gelert, ‘The Faithful Hound’, who was unaccountably absent. On Llewelyn's return the truant, stained and smeared with blood, joyfully sprang to meet his master. The prince alarmed hastened to find his son, and saw the infant's cot empty, the bedclothes and floor covered with blood. The frantic father plunged his sword into the hound's side, thinking it had killed his heir. The dog's dying yell was answered by a child's cry. Llewelyn searched and discovered his boy unharmed, but nearby lay the body of a mighty wolf which Gelert had slain. The prince filled with remorse is said never to have smiled again. He buried Gelert here". Beddgelert is a village steeped in Welsh mythology and legend. Dinas Emrys (meaning “fortress of Ambrosius”) is a rocky wooded hillock above the Glaslyn river where a castle once stood. Some believe the castle was erected by the Welsh prince Llewelyn the Last. According to legend the castle was the site of the famous exchange between the warlord Vortigern and a young Merlin. Fleeing Anglo-Saxon invaders Vortigen came to Wales and chose the hillfort as his retreat. However all efforts at building on the site failed, with workers returning daily to find collapsed masonry. Vortigern was counselled to seek the help of a young boy born of a virgin mother; a suitable boy was found named Myrddin Emrys (Merlin Ambrosius). Vortigern’s plan to kill Myrddin to appease the supernatural powers preventing him from building his fortress was scorned by Myrddin who instead explained that the fort could not stand due to a hidden pool containing two dragons. The White Dragon – he explained – of the Saxons would in time be defeated by the British Red Dragon. After Vortigern’s downfall the fort was given to Emrys Wledig (Ambrosius Aurelianus) from which it takes its name. As for the dragons and how they became confined? The story of Lludd Lleflys in the Mabinogion explains how Lludd captured the dragons in a cauldron filled with beer when they had transformed themselves – as apparently they did – into pigs. The dragons were buried at the place that later became known as Dinas Emrys since it was regarded as the safest place to put them. A further legend tells of Myrddin hiding treasure in a cave at Dinas Emrys. The legend says that the discoverer of the treasure will be ‘golden-haired and blue-eyed’ and that a bell will ring to invite him or her into the cave. But beware! Local folklore tells of a young man from Beddgelert who once went in search of the treasure and was met with unearthly noises and thunder and lightning as soon as he started to dig. He fled home and never returned; not even to collect his pickaxe! Nowadays little remains of the castle structures, however excavations from 1910 and 1954-56 reveal several periods of habitation; the earliest dating to perhaps the 1st or 2nd century. Perhaps most intriguingly the pool inside the structure has been identified and is perhaps connected to the take of Vortigern and the dragons. Why not visit and experience the legends and myths for yourself? Rupert Bear & Beddgelert Mr. Alfred Edmeades Bestall M.B.E. Illustrator of the famous Rupert Bear stories which ran in The Daily Express newspaper for over 40 years lived in Beddgelert. Bestall was a quiet man and is remembered fondly in the Village. He bought his little cottage "Penlan" in 1956. His most famous drawing "The Frogs Chorus" inspired the cartoon video "The Frog Song" composed by Paul McCartney. This became one of the best-selling videos. There is no doubt that many of the illustrations to Alfred's stories were inspired by the scenery in and around Beddgelert. Over the footbridge and alongside the River Glaslyn, a meadow known as "Cae Gel" has recently been planted with shrubs, trees and wild flowers, to be used as a picnic area. It has been created with the financial help of "The Followers of Rupert Bear" in memory of Alfred E. Bestall, M.B.E. Glaslyn Osprey Project Ospreys disappeared from the UK in 1916, but in 2004 a pair of breeding ospreys were found in North Wales near to Beddgelert. The ospreys spend every winter in West Africa, and each year they migrate many thousands of miles back to Snowdonia to breed and raise chicks. By 2009 the pair had raised 12 osprey fledglings; the progress of the birds being recorded by a ringing scheme. One of the Glaslyn ospreys has been tracked to Scotland where it has raised a family of its own. The Osprey Project ensures 24-hour protection for the eggs in the nest. The site is a major attraction for visitors to the area; both for keen twitchers and for visiting families. You can also keep up with the progress via the project's Facebook page.
Conwy Falls Forest Park and Waterfalls The spectacular Conwy falls runs through the deep gorge of the Fairy Glen, set in 10 acres of SSSI designated ancient native woodland. Laced with paths, viewpoints and glades, the Forest Park can be enjoyed free of charge. You are welcome to bring picnics and well behaved dogs to this special corner of the Snowdonia National Park. Free Wi-Fi and device charging points are available in the Café.
Rhaeadr Y Graig Lwyd
Conwy Falls Forest Park and Waterfalls The spectacular Conwy falls runs through the deep gorge of the Fairy Glen, set in 10 acres of SSSI designated ancient native woodland. Laced with paths, viewpoints and glades, the Forest Park can be enjoyed free of charge. You are welcome to bring picnics and well behaved dogs to this special corner of the Snowdonia National Park. Free Wi-Fi and device charging points are available in the Café.
Mountain Biking
Mountain Biking Wales - Uplift and downhill MTB trails The best mountain bike uplift in Snowdonia, Wales! Antur 'Stiniog offers 14 fantastic downhill mtb trails, graded green to black and the best mountain bike uplift service in the UK, some even say in the world! We also offer mountain bike hire powered by Nukeproof. Please contact us for further info on 01766 238 007. We have a state of the art fully equipped downhill centre complete with café, shop, showers, bike maintenance and bike wash. Siop 'Stiniog: We also have an outdoor shop, information centre, coffee house and art gallery in the heart of Blaenau Ffestiniog to suit all your outdoor needs and enquiries of the local area. Welcome to 'Stiniog! 'Stiniog is not for profit a social enterprise. It was established in June 2007, having received pledges of support from more than 2000 local residents, each sharing the same vision: “To develop the potential of the Outdoor Sector in the Ffestiniog area in a sustainable and innovative way for the benefit of the local residents and economy”. Antur 'Stiniog aims to realise this vision through a number of exciting projects which vary from enjoyment and training in the sector to developing a series of Mountain bike trails in the area. Current Projects: Velorail Antur 'Stiniog are aiming to develop the disused railway line between Blaenau Ffestiniog and Trawsfynydd. The Velorail project planned by Antur 'Stiniog, is unique and innovative, in that no other such facility exists in the UK. France has 36 Velorails across the country, with over half of these being in Northern France with its climate similar to ours (compared with Southern France). Other Velorail attractions exist in Spain, The Netherlands, Germany, Russia, Italy, and the Czech Republic. The concept uses low carbon, sustainable bicycle technology to propel an adapted carriage along a disused railway line, offering an outdoor family attraction, which is clean, active, and allows the user to take in breathtaking views of the surrounding countryside. Ambitiously Antur 'Stiniog hope to run a reduced Velorail attraction from Blaenau Ffestiniog to Llan Ffestiniog by 2016. Website address and to book online please click on the link https://www.anturstiniog.com/
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Antur Stiniog
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Mountain Biking Wales - Uplift and downhill MTB trails The best mountain bike uplift in Snowdonia, Wales! Antur 'Stiniog offers 14 fantastic downhill mtb trails, graded green to black and the best mountain bike uplift service in the UK, some even say in the world! We also offer mountain bike hire powered by Nukeproof. Please contact us for further info on 01766 238 007. We have a state of the art fully equipped downhill centre complete with café, shop, showers, bike maintenance and bike wash. Siop 'Stiniog: We also have an outdoor shop, information centre, coffee house and art gallery in the heart of Blaenau Ffestiniog to suit all your outdoor needs and enquiries of the local area. Welcome to 'Stiniog! 'Stiniog is not for profit a social enterprise. It was established in June 2007, having received pledges of support from more than 2000 local residents, each sharing the same vision: “To develop the potential of the Outdoor Sector in the Ffestiniog area in a sustainable and innovative way for the benefit of the local residents and economy”. Antur 'Stiniog aims to realise this vision through a number of exciting projects which vary from enjoyment and training in the sector to developing a series of Mountain bike trails in the area. Current Projects: Velorail Antur 'Stiniog are aiming to develop the disused railway line between Blaenau Ffestiniog and Trawsfynydd. The Velorail project planned by Antur 'Stiniog, is unique and innovative, in that no other such facility exists in the UK. France has 36 Velorails across the country, with over half of these being in Northern France with its climate similar to ours (compared with Southern France). Other Velorail attractions exist in Spain, The Netherlands, Germany, Russia, Italy, and the Czech Republic. The concept uses low carbon, sustainable bicycle technology to propel an adapted carriage along a disused railway line, offering an outdoor family attraction, which is clean, active, and allows the user to take in breathtaking views of the surrounding countryside. Ambitiously Antur 'Stiniog hope to run a reduced Velorail attraction from Blaenau Ffestiniog to Llan Ffestiniog by 2016. Website address and to book online please click on the link https://www.anturstiniog.com/
Activity
Do you dare to try Caverns? Fly, climb and traverse your way through our unique underground course in a slate mine disused for the past 200 years; if you’re up to the challenge that is! Don't worry, you don't have to complete the monkey bars if you don't want to! There's another route! Book in advance. I would recommend that as soon as you book accommodation you book your activities. To book follow the link https://www.zipworld.co.uk/
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Zip World Bounce Below
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Do you dare to try Caverns? Fly, climb and traverse your way through our unique underground course in a slate mine disused for the past 200 years; if you’re up to the challenge that is! Don't worry, you don't have to complete the monkey bars if you don't want to! There's another route! Book in advance. I would recommend that as soon as you book accommodation you book your activities. To book follow the link https://www.zipworld.co.uk/
Unfortunately this is closed for 2020. Due to reopen 2021
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Adventure Parc Snowdonia
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Unfortunately this is closed for 2020. Due to reopen 2021
Located in North Wales between Snowdon and the sea, Snowdonia Riding Stables offers you superb riding amongst some of the best mountain and coastal scenery in the British Isles, whether you are a complete beginner or a competent rider. With miles of traffic free bridleways we have access through spectacular scenery amongst the foothills of Snowdon. We have carefully selected horses and ponies to provide a range of sizes, types and temperaments to suit riders all abilities (or none at all!) We have been established over 30 years with a wealth of experience, and some of our customers are third generation! Snowdonia Riding Stables is approved by the Pony Club and the British Horse Society. Link to the website - https://www.snowdoniaridingstables.co.uk/
Snowdonia Riding Stables
Located in North Wales between Snowdon and the sea, Snowdonia Riding Stables offers you superb riding amongst some of the best mountain and coastal scenery in the British Isles, whether you are a complete beginner or a competent rider. With miles of traffic free bridleways we have access through spectacular scenery amongst the foothills of Snowdon. We have carefully selected horses and ponies to provide a range of sizes, types and temperaments to suit riders all abilities (or none at all!) We have been established over 30 years with a wealth of experience, and some of our customers are third generation! Snowdonia Riding Stables is approved by the Pony Club and the British Horse Society. Link to the website - https://www.snowdoniaridingstables.co.uk/
he riding centre at Gwydyr Stables (formerly Ty Coch) was established in 1973 and offers a wonderful location for horse riding, pony trekking or extended day trail rides. e are situated 4 miles from Betws y Coed and surrounded by National Trust and Forestry Commission land. It provides breathtaking scenery in which to enjoy the excellent views across the Snowdonia Mountains. ndividuals or groups are catered for by a team of experienced staff conducting rides on a variety of over 30 horses that range in size and ability from novice treks to experienced rides. The staff have to undergo continuous development especially on safety issues including first aid and riding qualifications. Radio contact is maintained with the centre during treks. Price List 2020 Half Hour £ 17.00 One Hour £ 25.00 One & half Hour £33.00 Two Hour £40.00 Half Day £46.00 Pub Ride £60.00 More details on Riding Holidays page... There is the opportunity to practice Archery whilst visiting Gwydyr Stables. ides are available throughout the year from a half-hour to full day, including summer evenings. Why not try our celebrated pub ride? Also available is our two or three-day trail rides around the area, with either camping, bunkhouse, B & B or hotel accommodation to chose from. ccommodation is available in the farmhouse or our on site caravan. Betws y Coed and Penmachno offer a variety of accommodation and other activity options. Rates include hire of hats Group rates available for 10 or more, ask for details. Limited disabled facilities Open all year En suite farm guesthouse accommodation Advance booking is always advisable. Telephone anytime or book on line (link to page) We are unable to accept credit cards. Please note that due to the duty of care we have to the horses there is a weight limit for participant's. Please contact us for further information. link to the website http://horse-riding-wales.co.uk/
Gwydyr Stables Riding & Trekking (formerly Ty Coch)
he riding centre at Gwydyr Stables (formerly Ty Coch) was established in 1973 and offers a wonderful location for horse riding, pony trekking or extended day trail rides. e are situated 4 miles from Betws y Coed and surrounded by National Trust and Forestry Commission land. It provides breathtaking scenery in which to enjoy the excellent views across the Snowdonia Mountains. ndividuals or groups are catered for by a team of experienced staff conducting rides on a variety of over 30 horses that range in size and ability from novice treks to experienced rides. The staff have to undergo continuous development especially on safety issues including first aid and riding qualifications. Radio contact is maintained with the centre during treks. Price List 2020 Half Hour £ 17.00 One Hour £ 25.00 One & half Hour £33.00 Two Hour £40.00 Half Day £46.00 Pub Ride £60.00 More details on Riding Holidays page... There is the opportunity to practice Archery whilst visiting Gwydyr Stables. ides are available throughout the year from a half-hour to full day, including summer evenings. Why not try our celebrated pub ride? Also available is our two or three-day trail rides around the area, with either camping, bunkhouse, B & B or hotel accommodation to chose from. ccommodation is available in the farmhouse or our on site caravan. Betws y Coed and Penmachno offer a variety of accommodation and other activity options. Rates include hire of hats Group rates available for 10 or more, ask for details. Limited disabled facilities Open all year En suite farm guesthouse accommodation Advance booking is always advisable. Telephone anytime or book on line (link to page) We are unable to accept credit cards. Please note that due to the duty of care we have to the horses there is a weight limit for participant's. Please contact us for further information. link to the website http://horse-riding-wales.co.uk/
Slate mines
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Llechwedd
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Slate mines
COMFORTABLE CARRIAGES & HISTORIC STEAM ENGINES Covid update - Booking online only please follow the link https://www.festrail.co.uk/ Limited Service Our reopening service will only operate on the Ffestiniog Railway – from Porthmadog to Tan-y-Bwlch. Please note there will be no other train services on the F&WHR at present. This new service will run daily, with six round-trips per day, and trains departing from Harbour Station at 10:00, 11:05, 12:10, 13:15, 14:20 and 15:25. The total journey time will be approximately 2 hours 45 minutes, including a one-hour layover at Tan-y-Bwlch. All journeys start and finish at Porthmadog. Tickets must be booked in advance (see below). Passengers cannot join (or alight from) trains at any other station, halt or request stop. Online Booking Only Tickets will only be available via online booking and cannot be purchased at our Booking Office. We have initially released tickets for 6 trains per day running between 20th July and 31st July, and 2 trains per day from 1st August to 28th August. further August tickets will be released in due course. The individual compartments in our heritage carriages will help to maintain social distancing on the train. Each compartment seats up to 6 passengers, and additional dividers have been installed between seating bays. Ticket prices start from £50 per compartment, which includes the fare for 2 adults. Tickets for each additional adult cost £25, while the fare for each child will be £1. NOTE: there is a maximum of 6 people per compartment. If you are a solo traveller, you must still pay the £50 fare for the compartment. Tickets will be sent via email and must be presented to the Station Host or Train Guard for inspection prior to boarding the train. Alternatively, if you prefer, you can print the tickets at home and bring them with you to the station. The tickets will display your details and the number of travellers. They will not include any details of seat numbers or carriage compartments, which you will be free to choose upon arrival. Safety Measures at the Stations Upon arrival at Harbour Station, routes into, through and out of the station will be clearly signed. It is important that all visitors adhere to these routes, while also maintaining social distancing. NOTE: there will be no catering service on these trains. There will be two routes to the trains – one through the Booking Hall direct to the platform and one through Spooner’s for those wishing to order takeaway refreshments prior to their journey. Harbour Station shop will remain closed. Visitors are asked to use ‘contactless’ card payments whenever possible. We are also encouraging visitors to wear face coverings during their visit. Complimentary masks will be available at Harbour Station if you do not have your own. Hand sanitiser stations will be provided on platforms. We advise passengers to use these prior to boarding the trains to reduce potential contamination. Social Distancing signs will be in place to manage queues for the toilet facilities at both stations. Tan-y-Bwlch Café will be open to passengers and the general public, offering food and drinks from a limited takeaway menu – which can be taken on board for the journey. There will be a one-way route through Tan-y-Bwlch Café in order to safely manage the flow of visitors. There will be plenty of outdoor seating available throughout the station area. Safety Measures on board the trains Our carriages will be regularly deep-cleaned using ‘Zoono’, a long-lasting disinfectant surface sanitiser which offers up to 30 days of protection. We will be using three sets of heritage carriages, which contain separated compartments, helping to maintain social distancing on the train. As stated above, these compartments have the capacity to seat up to 6 passengers. Each compartment will be numbered, with visitors able to choose their compartment before boarding the train. Passengers must use their chosen compartment for the duration of the return journey. All carriages will be cleaned by our staff between each departure, ensuring the compartments will be safe and ready for you to enjoy upon arrival. Outstanding scenery, comfortable carriages and historic steam engines await you here in the heart of Snowdonia. Glorious coastlines, ancient oak woodlands, mountains, rivers and castles, all beckon as you embark on your journey on our award winning railways. With some of the most comfortable carriages on any preserved railway – standard or narrow gauge – you can step back in time to a more civilised age. Relax and enjoy the stunning scenery of Snowdonia in comfort, with at-seat buffet service, snacks, refreshments and a fully-licenced bar featuring locally-brewed award-winning beers. he Ffestiniog Railway is the world’s oldest narrow gauge railway with almost 200 years of history, taking you on a 13½-mile journey from the harbour in Porthmadog to the slate-quarrying town of Blaenau Ffestiniog. Our historic trains climb over 700 feet from sea level into the mountains through tranquil pastures and magnificent forests, past lakes and waterfalls, round tight bends (even a complete spiral) clinging to the side of the mountain or tunnelling through it. The Welsh Highland Railway is the UK’s longest heritage railway and runs for 25 miles from Caernarfon, past the foot of Snowdon and the picture postcard village of Beddgelert, then through the stunning Aberglaslyn Pass and on to Porthmadog. Passengers ride in some of the most comfortable carriages on any heritage railway in the UK, including first class Pullman luxury and freshly-cooked food delivered to your seat. 2019 saw the opening of the new £3.5 million Caernarfon Station, offering greatly-improved passenger facilities. The new building befits the spectacular surroundings and provides a fitting gateway into the heart of the Snowdonia National Park. Travel back in time and discover what trains were like in Victorian times, the Roaring Twenties or the Swinging Sixties… Our Heritage carriages are once again coming to the fore, much like they did in the 1960s, as we run our special Heritage Service on the Ffestiniog Railway between Porthmadog and Tan y Bwlch. We have been working hard to design a service that is both safe and enjoyable, allowing you to appreciate all the fantastic features our railway has to offer. This new look ‘Summer’ service will undoubtedly be different to what many of us expected at the start of the year, but we are determined to make it a worthwhile experience for all our visitors.
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Ffestiniog Railway
12 Cromwell St
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COMFORTABLE CARRIAGES & HISTORIC STEAM ENGINES Covid update - Booking online only please follow the link https://www.festrail.co.uk/ Limited Service Our reopening service will only operate on the Ffestiniog Railway – from Porthmadog to Tan-y-Bwlch. Please note there will be no other train services on the F&WHR at present. This new service will run daily, with six round-trips per day, and trains departing from Harbour Station at 10:00, 11:05, 12:10, 13:15, 14:20 and 15:25. The total journey time will be approximately 2 hours 45 minutes, including a one-hour layover at Tan-y-Bwlch. All journeys start and finish at Porthmadog. Tickets must be booked in advance (see below). Passengers cannot join (or alight from) trains at any other station, halt or request stop. Online Booking Only Tickets will only be available via online booking and cannot be purchased at our Booking Office. We have initially released tickets for 6 trains per day running between 20th July and 31st July, and 2 trains per day from 1st August to 28th August. further August tickets will be released in due course. The individual compartments in our heritage carriages will help to maintain social distancing on the train. Each compartment seats up to 6 passengers, and additional dividers have been installed between seating bays. Ticket prices start from £50 per compartment, which includes the fare for 2 adults. Tickets for each additional adult cost £25, while the fare for each child will be £1. NOTE: there is a maximum of 6 people per compartment. If you are a solo traveller, you must still pay the £50 fare for the compartment. Tickets will be sent via email and must be presented to the Station Host or Train Guard for inspection prior to boarding the train. Alternatively, if you prefer, you can print the tickets at home and bring them with you to the station. The tickets will display your details and the number of travellers. They will not include any details of seat numbers or carriage compartments, which you will be free to choose upon arrival. Safety Measures at the Stations Upon arrival at Harbour Station, routes into, through and out of the station will be clearly signed. It is important that all visitors adhere to these routes, while also maintaining social distancing. NOTE: there will be no catering service on these trains. There will be two routes to the trains – one through the Booking Hall direct to the platform and one through Spooner’s for those wishing to order takeaway refreshments prior to their journey. Harbour Station shop will remain closed. Visitors are asked to use ‘contactless’ card payments whenever possible. We are also encouraging visitors to wear face coverings during their visit. Complimentary masks will be available at Harbour Station if you do not have your own. Hand sanitiser stations will be provided on platforms. We advise passengers to use these prior to boarding the trains to reduce potential contamination. Social Distancing signs will be in place to manage queues for the toilet facilities at both stations. Tan-y-Bwlch Café will be open to passengers and the general public, offering food and drinks from a limited takeaway menu – which can be taken on board for the journey. There will be a one-way route through Tan-y-Bwlch Café in order to safely manage the flow of visitors. There will be plenty of outdoor seating available throughout the station area. Safety Measures on board the trains Our carriages will be regularly deep-cleaned using ‘Zoono’, a long-lasting disinfectant surface sanitiser which offers up to 30 days of protection. We will be using three sets of heritage carriages, which contain separated compartments, helping to maintain social distancing on the train. As stated above, these compartments have the capacity to seat up to 6 passengers. Each compartment will be numbered, with visitors able to choose their compartment before boarding the train. Passengers must use their chosen compartment for the duration of the return journey. All carriages will be cleaned by our staff between each departure, ensuring the compartments will be safe and ready for you to enjoy upon arrival. Outstanding scenery, comfortable carriages and historic steam engines await you here in the heart of Snowdonia. Glorious coastlines, ancient oak woodlands, mountains, rivers and castles, all beckon as you embark on your journey on our award winning railways. With some of the most comfortable carriages on any preserved railway – standard or narrow gauge – you can step back in time to a more civilised age. Relax and enjoy the stunning scenery of Snowdonia in comfort, with at-seat buffet service, snacks, refreshments and a fully-licenced bar featuring locally-brewed award-winning beers. he Ffestiniog Railway is the world’s oldest narrow gauge railway with almost 200 years of history, taking you on a 13½-mile journey from the harbour in Porthmadog to the slate-quarrying town of Blaenau Ffestiniog. Our historic trains climb over 700 feet from sea level into the mountains through tranquil pastures and magnificent forests, past lakes and waterfalls, round tight bends (even a complete spiral) clinging to the side of the mountain or tunnelling through it. The Welsh Highland Railway is the UK’s longest heritage railway and runs for 25 miles from Caernarfon, past the foot of Snowdon and the picture postcard village of Beddgelert, then through the stunning Aberglaslyn Pass and on to Porthmadog. Passengers ride in some of the most comfortable carriages on any heritage railway in the UK, including first class Pullman luxury and freshly-cooked food delivered to your seat. 2019 saw the opening of the new £3.5 million Caernarfon Station, offering greatly-improved passenger facilities. The new building befits the spectacular surroundings and provides a fitting gateway into the heart of the Snowdonia National Park. Travel back in time and discover what trains were like in Victorian times, the Roaring Twenties or the Swinging Sixties… Our Heritage carriages are once again coming to the fore, much like they did in the 1960s, as we run our special Heritage Service on the Ffestiniog Railway between Porthmadog and Tan y Bwlch. We have been working hard to design a service that is both safe and enjoyable, allowing you to appreciate all the fantastic features our railway has to offer. This new look ‘Summer’ service will undoubtedly be different to what many of us expected at the start of the year, but we are determined to make it a worthwhile experience for all our visitors.
WORLD FAMOUS Zip ropes
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Zip World Slate Caverns
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WORLD FAMOUS Zip ropes
Limited activities for 2020. Pease check their website for further information. https://www.nationalwhitewatercentre.co.uk/2020-rafting-full-session SESSION INFORMATION Our most popular rafting session! This two hour session takes you crashing down the Upper Tryweryn’s natural, Welsh mountain white water rapids, with enough time to usually fit in 4 exciting and challenging runs of the one mile section! REQUIREMENTS We are limited to a minimum of 4 people and maximum of 5 people per raft at the moment. Unfortunately we're not able to accommodate groups of 3 people or less or groups of 6 or 7 people at this time. Minimum age: 12 years old Must be able to swim 25 metres Arrival time: 30 minutes prior to session start time Approx duration: 2 hours Wetsuits must be worn and can be hired for £5 per person Terms & Conditions IMPORTANT INFORMATION The safety of our visitors and staff is important to us. Only one household / bubble of two households is permitted per raft. We ask you to respect all social distancing measures put in place onsite. Give us a call on 01678 521083 for more information or to book. GROUPS (4-5 PEOPLE PER RAFT) Price: £350 per raft Book white water Rafting Taster Session We are not currently taking bookings of less than 4 people in 2020. If this session is not suitable for you, please look at our activities page to see what's on offer in 2021!
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National White Water Centre/ Canolfan Dŵr Gwyn Genedlaethol
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Limited activities for 2020. Pease check their website for further information. https://www.nationalwhitewatercentre.co.uk/2020-rafting-full-session SESSION INFORMATION Our most popular rafting session! This two hour session takes you crashing down the Upper Tryweryn’s natural, Welsh mountain white water rapids, with enough time to usually fit in 4 exciting and challenging runs of the one mile section! REQUIREMENTS We are limited to a minimum of 4 people and maximum of 5 people per raft at the moment. Unfortunately we're not able to accommodate groups of 3 people or less or groups of 6 or 7 people at this time. Minimum age: 12 years old Must be able to swim 25 metres Arrival time: 30 minutes prior to session start time Approx duration: 2 hours Wetsuits must be worn and can be hired for £5 per person Terms & Conditions IMPORTANT INFORMATION The safety of our visitors and staff is important to us. Only one household / bubble of two households is permitted per raft. We ask you to respect all social distancing measures put in place onsite. Give us a call on 01678 521083 for more information or to book. GROUPS (4-5 PEOPLE PER RAFT) Price: £350 per raft Book white water Rafting Taster Session We are not currently taking bookings of less than 4 people in 2020. If this session is not suitable for you, please look at our activities page to see what's on offer in 2021!